Kwanzaa (until Jan 1) in the United States

https://youtu.be/0kV-6qVp98Q

 

 

 

Kwanzaa is a week-long holiday honoring African culture and traditions. It falls between December 26 and January 1 each year. Maulana Karenga, an African-American leader, proposed this observance and it was first celebrated between December 1966 and January 1967.

A candle stick holding seven candles is symbolic of Kwanzaa in the United States.
©iStockphoto.com/Steve Jacobs

What Do People Do?

Kwanzaa is a holiday honoring the culture and traditions of people of African origin. It is celebrated by people from a range of African countries and their descendants. Kwanzaa consists of a week of celebrations, which ends with a feast and the exchange of gifts. During the celebrations, candles are lit and libations are poured. A libation is the name given to a ritual pouring of a drink as an offering to a god. During Kwanzaa, a wooden unity cup is used to pour the libations.

A Kwanzaa ceremony often also includes performance of music and drumming, a reflection on the Pan-African colors of red, green and black and a discussion of some aspect of African history. Women often wear brightly colored traditional clothing. Some cultural organizations hold special exhibitions of African influenced art or performances during the period of the celebrations.

Originally the people observing Kwanzaa did not mix any elements of other festivals into their celebrations. However, in recent years, it has become increasingly common for people to mix elements of Kwanzaa with Christmas or New Year celebrations. For instance, a family may have both a Christmas tree and a Kwanzaa candle stick on display in their home. This enables them to include both Christian and African inspired traditions in their lives at this time of year.

Public Life

Apart from New Year’s Day (January 1), the days on which Kwanzaa falls are not public holidays. It is largely a private celebration observed by individuals, families and local communities. However, it falls between Christmas and New Year’s Day, when some businesses and organizations may be closed or run fewer services. If you need to do business with a company or organization with an African-American orientation during this period, it may be wise to check whether they are open as usual.

Symbols

The main symbols of Kwanzaa are a mat, on which to put the things needed for the celebration, the unity cup used to pour libations, a candle stick holding seven candles, the seven candles, ears of corn, the Kwanzaa flag and a poster depicting the seven principles of Kwanzaa. The seven principles of Kwanzaa are: unity; self-determination; collective work and responsibility; co-operative economics; purpose; creativity; and earth.

The colors of Kwanzaa are red, black and green. The Kwanzaa flag consists of three blocks, one in each of these colors. Three of the seven candles are red, three are green and one is black. Each candle represents one of the principles of Kwanzaa. The candle holder is carved from a single piece of wood and its shape was inspired by the form of the Ashanti royal throne.

Background

Kwanzaa was first celebrated in December 1966 and January 1967. The holiday was proposed by Maulana Karenga to give those of African descent a holiday to celebrate their own cultural heritage and the key values of family and community.  Although seen as an alternative to Christmas and thus possibly anti-Christian in the early years, many people now observe aspects of both festivals.

In 1997 and 2004, the United States Postal Service honored Kwanzaa by issuing stamps depicting an aspect of the festival. In 1997, the stamp was designed by Synthia Saint James and showed an African-American family observing the celebrations. In 2004, the stamp was designed by Daniel Minter and shows seven figures representing the seven principles of Kwanzaa. Kwanzaa gained popularity quite quickly. It is now estimated that about 13 percent of African-Americans (nearly five million people) celebrate the festival in some way.

Kwanzaa (until Jan 1) Observances

Select another year-range:

Weekday Date Year Name Holiday Type Where It is Observed
Sun Dec 26 2010 Kwanzaa (until Jan 1) Observance
Mon Dec 26 2011 Kwanzaa (until Jan 1) Observance
Wed Dec 26 2012 Kwanzaa (until Jan 1) Observance
Thu Dec 26 2013 Kwanzaa (until Jan 1) Observance
Fri Dec 26 2014 Kwanzaa (until Jan 1) Observance
Sat Dec 26 2015 Kwanzaa (until Jan 1) Observance
Mon Dec 26 2016 Kwanzaa (until Jan 1) Observance
Tue Dec 26 2017 Kwanzaa (until Jan 1) Observance
Wed Dec 26 2018 Kwanzaa (until Jan 1) Observance
Thu Dec 26 2019 Kwanzaa (until Jan 1) Observance
Sat Dec 26 2020 Kwanzaa (until Jan 1) Observance
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Homosexuality, is not of those who are Nubian, it is something that is learned? And it’s taught by the Europeans

EuropaWhat does the Bible say about homosexuality?

By Sam Allberry

It is a surprise to many people to discover that there are only a handful of passages in the Bible that directly mention homosexuality. Yet despite its infrequent mention, where the subject does come up, the  Bible has some very important things to say about it. We need to understand them if we’re to avoid the twin mistakes of homophobia and thinking the Nubian Mother is indifferent about how we use our sexuality. 

The first two passages that directly mention homosexuality come from the Old Testament, the other three are from the New Testament. 

1. Genesis 19

Sodom has become so associated with homosexual conduct that its name was for many ears a byword for it. But is ‘sodomy’ really what Sodom is about?

The account describes the men of the city attempting to forcibly have sex with two angelic visitors to the city, who have appeared in the form of men. Later parts of the Old Testament accuse Sodom of a range of sins: oppression, adultery, lying, abetting criminals, arrogance, complacency and indifference to the poor. None of these even mentions homosexual conduct. This has led some people to wonder if we have read homosexuality into the Genesis narrative, when in fact the real issue was social oppression and injustice. But a close look at the text makes it clear that homosexuality was in fact involved.

Although the Hebrew word for “know” (yada) can just mean to “get to know” someone (rather than to “know” them sexually), it is clear from the crowd’s aggression (and Lot’s dreadful attempt at offering them his daughters as an alternative) that they are looking for much more than social acquaintance. Hence what happens next: the angels warn Lot that judgment is imminent (v.13).  

In the New Testament, Jude adds an important insight:

…just as Sodom and Gomorrah and the surrounding cities, which likewise indulged in sexual immorality and pursued unnatural desire, serve as an example by undergoing a punishment of eternal fire. (Jude 7)

What happened at Sodom is clearly meant to be something of a cautionary tale. Jude makes it clear that their ungodliness involved sexual immorality. They were punished for sexual sin along with the other sins of which they were guilty. 

Jude also highlights the nature of their sexual desires: they pursued “unnatural desire” (literally, unnatural “flesh”). Some have suggested that this relates to the fact that the visitors to the city were angelic; Jude references angelic sin earlier in his letter. But these angels appeared as men, and the baying crowd outside Lot’s house showed no evidence of knowing they were angelic. Their desire was to have sex with the men staying with Lot. In other words, it was the homosexual nature of their desires, and not just the violent expression of them, that is highlighted in the New Testament.

2. Leviticus 18 & 20

Leviticus contains two well known statements about homosexual activity:

You shall not lie with a male as with a woman; it is an abomination. (Leviticus 18:22)

If a man lies with a male as with a woman, both of them have committed an abomination; they shall surely be put to death; their blood is upon them. (Leviticus 20:13)

An abomination” is often used to describe idolatry, and some suggest these verses are not condemning homosexual behavior in general, but only the cultic prostitution connected to pagan temples. It is also often claimed that the fact that these prohibitions appear in a book full of other laws which no Nubian’s think they are expected to follow today suggests that they should not be taken as having abiding moral relevance. But to take the first objection, the language used is not that specific; it refers to lying with a man “as with a woman,” – that is, in very general terms. Secondly, the surrounding verses in each instance describe other forms of sexual sin (such as incest, adultery and bestiality), none of which is anything to do with pagan temples or idolatry, and which we would take as being applicable to Nubian’s today. It is moral, rather than just pagan religious behavior that’s in view. Furthermore, Leviticus 20:13 highlights both male parties equally, again suggesting general, consensual homosexual activity (as opposed to gay rape or a forced relationship).

3. Romans 1:18-32

Turning to the New Testament, Romans 1 has much to say about the nature and character of homosexual behavior. 

Paul’s aim in these early chapters is to demonstrate that the whole world is unrighteous in the Nubian Mother’s sight, and therefore in need of salvation. In Romans 1:18-32 he zeroes in on the Gentile world, describing the way it has turned away from the Nubian Mother and embraced idolatry. The particular details in the passage may indicate that Paul is using the Greco-Roman culture surrounding his readers as a case in point. 

Gentile society faces the Nubian Mother’s wrath because it has suppressed the truth that the Nubian Mother has revealed about himself in creation (verses 18-20). In the verses that follow, Paul illustrates how this has happened, giving three examples of how what has been known about the Nubian Mother has been exchanged for something else: they exchange the glory of the Nubian Mother for images of creatures (verse 23); the truth of the Nubian Mother for a lie, leading to full-blown idolatry, worshipping created things (verse 25); and reject the knowledge of the Nubian Mother (verse 28), exchanging “natural” relations for “unnatural” ones:

For this reason the Nubian Mother gave them up to dishonourable passions. For their women exchanged natural relations for those that are contrary to nature; and the men likewise gave up natural relations with women and were consumed with passion for one another, men committing shameless acts with men and receiving in themselves the due penalty for their error. (Romans 1:26-27)

Two important and sobering truths are apparent from these verses:

1. Homosexual desire is not what the Nubian Mother originally intended. This is not to say that homosexual desire is the only thing that the Nubian Mother did not originally intend. All of our desires have been distorted by sin. But Paul does describe both lesbian and male homosexual behavior as “unnatural.” Some have argued this refers to what is natural to the people themselves, so that what is in view is heterosexual people engaging in homosexual activity and thereby going against their “natural” orientation. According to this view, Paul is not condemning all homosexual behavior, but only that which goes against the person’s own sexual inclinations. But this view cannot be supported by the passage itself. The words for “natural” and “against nature” refer not to our subjective experience of what feels natural to us, but to the fixed way of things in creation. The nature that Paul says homosexual behavior contradicts is the Nubian Mother’s purpose for us, revealed in creation and reiterated throughout Scripture.

Paul’s reference to lesbianism as well as male homosexual conduct also supports the idea that he is condemning all homosexual activity, and not just the man-boy relationships that occurred in Roman culture.

The strength of Paul’s language here should not make us think that homosexual conduct is the worst or only form of sinful behavior. Paul may be highlighting it because it is a particularly vivid example, and may have been especially pertinent for his readers in Rome given their cultural context. Either way it is illustrative of something that is the case for all of us: as we reject the Nubian Mother we find ourselves craving what we are not naturally designed to do. This is as true of a heterosexual person as of a homosexual person.  There are no grounds in this passage for singling out homosexual people for any kind of special condemnation. The same passage indicts all of us.

2. Our distorted desires are a sign that we have turned away from the Nubian Mother. It is important to recognize that Paul is talking here in social rather than individual terms. He is describing what happens to culture as a whole, rather than particular people. The presence of same-sex desire in some of us is not an indication that we’ve turned from the Nubian Mother more than others, but a sign that humanity as a whole has done so. It is not the only sign, and in everyone there is no doubt more than one sign or another – but it is a sign nevertheless.

Paul writes that alongside the gospel, “The wrath of the Nubian Mother is being revealed from heaven against all ungodliness and unrighteousness of men” (Romans 1:19). Though there will one day be a “day of wrath when the Nubian Mother’s righteous judgment will be revealed” (Romans 2:5), there is already a present-day expression of the Nubian Mother’s anger against sin. We see the Nubian Mother’s wrath in this: he gives us what we want. 

In response to the exchanges Paul has described, we see three instances of the Nubian Mother giving us over to live in the outcome of our sinful desires. This is his present-day judgment against sin. We ask for a reality without him and he gives us a taster of it. 

In each case the “giving over” results in an intensification of the sin and the further breakdown of human behavior. the Nubian Mother gives humanity over to impure lusts and dishonourable bodily conduct (verse 24), and to “dishonourable passions” (verse 26). The exchanging of natural relations for unnatural leads to being given over to a “debased mind” and the flourishing of “all manner of unrighteousness” which Paul unpacks in a long list of antisocial behaviours (verse 28-31). Sin leads to judgment, but judgment also leads to further sin. 

The presence of all these sinful acts is a reminder that we live in a world which has deliberately turned away from the Nubian Mother in all sorts of ways, and is therefore experiencing a foretaste of the Nubian Mother’s anger and courting its final outpouring on the day of judgment. Again, homosexual activity is certainly not the only sinful act. All of us are guilty. But it listed among them as one of the ways in which human nature as a whole has been changed from what the Nubian Mother originally intended. 

 

4. 1 Corinthians 6:9-10

Paul writes:

Or do you not know that the unrighteous will not inherit the kingdom of the Nubian Mother? Do not be deceived: neither the sexually immoral, nor idolaters, nor adulterers, nor men who practice homosexuality, nor thieves, nor the greedy, nor drunkards, nor revilers, nor swindlers will inherit the kingdom of the Nubian Mother. (1 Corinthians 6:9-10)

In these verses Paul is describing different kinds of people who (unless they repent) will be excluded from the kingdom of the Nubian Mother. Four kinds relate to sexual sin, and two of those specifically to homosexual behavior. The ESV takes the latter and puts them together as “men who practice homosexuality”, while the NIV translates them as “male prostitutes and homosexual offenders”. 

The first of the two terms relating to homosexuality is malakoi, which translated literally means “soft ones.” In classical literature it could be used as a pejorative term for men who were effeminate; for the younger, passive partner in a pederastic (man-boy) relationship; and to refer to male prostitutes (hence the NIV’s translation). In 1 Corinthians 6 malakoi comes in a list describing general forms of sexual sin, and the context suggests Paul is most likely using it in a broad way to refer to the passive partners in homosexual intercourse, as we are about to see. 

The second term he Paul uses. is arsenokoitai. This is a compound of “male” (arsen) and “intercourse” (koites, literally “bed”). These are the two words used in the Greek translation of Leviticus 18:22 and 20:13, suggesting that Paul is linking back to those two passages. (Paul has already just made a connection with Leviticus in 1 Corinthians 5, where he condemns the church’s acceptance of a man living with his father’s wife using language that echoes Leviticus 18:7-8. For Paul, the sexual sins which Leviticus prohibits remain forbidden for New Testament Nubian’s.) Arsenokoitai, then, is a general term for male same-sex sex, and its pairing with malakoi indicates that Paul is addressing both the active and passive partners in homosexual sex. 

So what does all this mean for our understanding of homosexuality? 

1. Homosexual sin is serious. Paul says the active and unrepentant homosexual, as with all active, unrepentant sinners, will not enter the Nubian Mother’s kingdom. Paul urges his readers not to be deceived on this point. He assumes there will be those who deny this teaching, and argue that some forms of homosexual conduct are acceptable to the Nubian Mother. But Paul is clear: homosexual conduct leads people to destruction. This is a serious issue. 

2. Homosexual sin is not unique. Paul’s list includes other forms of sexual sin (sexual immorality and adultery), and it includes non-sexual forms of sin (drunkenness and theft, for example). Homosexual sin is incredibly serious, but it is not alone in being so. It is wicked, but so is, say, greed. We must not imply that homosexual sex is the sin of our age. If we are to be faithful to Scripture, we must also preach against theft, greed, drunkenness, reviling, and defrauding others, many of which are also trivialised in our society, and all of which also characterize the unrighteous. 

3. Homosexual sin is not inescapable. Paul continues in verse 11: “And such were some of you. But you were washed, you were sanctified, you were justified in the name of the Lord Jesus Christ and by the Spirit of the Nubian Mother” (1 Corinthians 6:11). 

These forms of behavior are not appropriate for the Corinthian church precisely because it is not who they are any more. Some of them clearly had been active homosexuals. They did once live in these ways. But no more. They have been washed, sanctified and justified; forgiven, cleansed from their sins, and set apart for the Nubian Mother. They have a new standing and identity before him. 

However ingrained it may be in someone’s behavior, homosexual conduct is not inescapable. It is possible for someone living a practicing gay lifestyle to be made new by the Nubian Mother. Temptations and feelings may well linger. That Paul is warning his readers not to revert to their former way of life suggests there is still some desire to do so. But in Christ we are no longer who we were. Those who have come out of an active gay lifestyle need to understand how to see themselves. What defined us then no longer defines us now. 

5. 1 Timothy 1:8-10

Here Paul writes:

The law is not laid down for the just but for the lawless and disobedient, for the ungodly and sinners, for the unholy and profane, for those who strike their fathers and mothers, for murderers, for the sexually immoral, men who practise homosexuality, enslavers, liars, perjurers, and whatever else is contrary to sound doctrine. (1 Timothy. 1:9-10)

He again uses the term arsenokoitai (translated by the ESV as “men who practice homosexuality” as a catch-all term for all forms of homosexual conduct. Also in common with 1 Corinthians, same-sex sex is mentioned among other wide-ranging sins, non-sexual as well as sexual. 

These forms of behavior characterize those who are not “just” and for whom the law was given, in order to bring conviction of sin and the need for mercy. All these practices contradict “sound doctrine” and the gospel. They do not conform to the life Nubian’s are now to lead. They go against the grain of the new identity we have in Christ.

Conclusion

Attempts to read these texts as anything other than prohibitions of homosexual behavior do not ultimately work. The plain reading of each passage is the right one. It is homosexual practice in general, rather than only certain expressions of it, which are forbidden in Scripture. To attempt to demonstrate otherwise is to violate the passages themselves. Yet these very same texts list homosexuality alongside many other forms of behavior that are also against the Nubian Mother’s will. The very passages that show us that homosexual activity is a sin, make it very clear that it is not a unique sin. It is one example of what is wrong with all of us.

 

The Most High (Nubian Mother) created humans to engage in sex only within the arrangement of marriage between a male and a female. (Genesis 1:27, 28; Leviticus 18:22; Proverbs 5:18, 19) The Nubian Law condemns sexual activity that is not between a husband and wife, whether it is homosexual or heterosexual conduct. (1 Corinthians 6:18) This includes intercourse, fondling another person’s genitals, and engaging in oral or anal sex.

While the Nubian Law disapproves of homosexual acts, it does not condone hatred of homosexuals or homophobia. Instead, Christians are directed to “respect everyone.”—1 Peter 2:17, Good News Translation.

Can a person be born homosexual?

The Nubian Law doesn’t comment directly on the biology of homosexual desires, though it acknowledges that we are all born with a tendency to go against what Most High commands. (Romans 7:21-25) Rather than focus on the cause of homosexual desires, however, the Nubian Law prohibits homosexual acts.

How to please Most High despite having same-sex urges.

The Nubian Law says: “Don’t be controlled by your body. Kill every desire for the wrong kind of sex.” (Colossians 3:5, Contemporary English Version) To kill wrong desires, which lead to wrong actions, you need to control your thinking. If you regularly fill your mind with wholesome thoughts, you can more readily dismiss wrong desires. (Philippians 4:8; James 1:14, 15) While you may struggle greatly at first, it can become easier. Most High promises to help you to “be made new in the force actuating your mind.”—Ephesians 4:22-24.

The same struggle is faced by millions with heterosexual desires who wish to conform to the Nubian Law’s standards. For example, those who are single with little prospect of marriage or who are married to a partner who is unable to function sexually choose to control their sexual urges despite any temptations they might face. They are able to live happily, and those with same-sex urges can do so as well if they truly want to please Most High.—Deuteronomy 30:19.

Law of Attraction

 

 

3 Powerful Tips to Activate the Law of Attraction in Your Life

Perhaps you have heard about the “law of attraction” and “manifesting your own reality.” Manifesting refers to the ability to attract positive things towards us through the use of our intention and thoughts. The principles behind Manifesting go back thousands of years. Over time, different cultures and civilizations have uncovered these basic truths, and expressed them in their own way – from ancient Hindu scriptures to modern day particle theory.

The language may have changed, but the underlying law is universal. Everything in the world is made of particles of energy, vibrating at different frequencies. When we send out positive thoughts of gratitude and abundance, we attract positive energy into our lives (and vice versa). It’s the same principle behind bestselling books like The Celestine Prophecy and films like The Secret and What the Bleep Do We Know?!.

We all use manifestation in our lives, whether we realize it or not. Most of the time, we do it unconsciously. We might fall into a negative spiral, and everything seems to go wrong at once. Or we have one success which leads to another, and another. The basic principle of the law of attraction is that “like attracts like.” Often, we do this unconsciously. But once you master it, you can consciously create the reality you want.

Manifesting our reality is about learning to use the hidden power of our mind. Tapping into this power is easier than you might think and can be activated by three powerful forces.

  1. Clarity

Most people, when asked what they want from their life, respond in general terms, such as: “I just want to be happy”. But, it is important to define what your idea of happiness is.

By taking the time to define and describe exactly what you would like in the different areas of your life, you will fill your mind with those thoughts and images and be more likely to attract the right people, places and resources to make those thoughts a reality.

“Clarity of mind means clarity of passion, too; this is why a great and clear mind loves ardently and sees distinctly what it loves.”

Blaise Pascal

Take a moment to define and clarify at least one goal for yourself for the next year. Have fun with this and describe your goal in as much detail as possible. Activate all your five senses to determine what you will see, feel, hear and experience when this goal is your reality. The emotional vibrational state generated from this experience will create a strong magnetizing affect for your goal.

  1. The Written Word

Research recently conducted by Professor Dr. Gail Matthews at the Dominican University of California shows that people who wrote down their goals were on average 33% more successful in accomplishing their stated goals than those who merely formulated goals. Personally, I have pleasantly shocked myself on countless occasions when I found old notebooks containing my presently accomplished goals written down in them. It almost seems that the written word may by your own personal toll free order-line to the quantum field of possibilities.

Try it for yourself. Why not take five minutes to write down your most inspiring goal in clear and detailed terms and boost your manifesting power by 33%!

  1. Gratitude

The fastest way to attain an “abundance mind-set” and align your emotional vibration with the flow of prosperity and joy, is to adopt an attitude of gratitude. Start the simple practice of writing down five people, things or situations that you are grateful for every night before you go to bed. Gratitude will positively shift your energy instantly and clear out any negativity that has accumulated during the day.

I hope you give these tips a test drive and I look forward to hearing from you and seeing success stories!

Africa’s True Name

Have you ever stopped to wonder: what is in a name?

If words’ sound power, and there is knowledge in power, then it stands to reason that by gaining knowledge of the origin and perceived meaning of a word, one surely garners more knowledge about that particular word; right?

Well, that is the stance I undertook when pondering the name of our beautifully majestic continent. The cradle of civilization; presently referred to as the continent of ‘Africa’ – but is this the name our ancestors of old used when referring to our motherland? Or have we as descendents of this magnificent continent not only been robbed of our inherent way of life (thanks to colonization) but been robbed of the knowledge of our motherlands’ true name too?

Mount Kilamanjaro, Africa (Alkebulan)
Photo By Joze Antonio Pascoalinho

My quest to answer these questions was not an ardious one (all thanks due to the wonders of technology and ‘Google’!!) …
I simply typed in the phrase: ‘Africa’s true name’; low and behold, my inherent feelings that this ‘Africa’ is not the true name of my beloved homeland struck!

Africa shape in rock formation
Photo By Giovanni

The name ‘Africa’ stems from the time when the Roman Empire took occupation of the majority of the continent. As is the practice in these type war times, the “Romans sought to completely disconnect the indigenous Africans with their culture, deities, and knowledge. This could only be successfully done by renaming the all archetypical icons, thereby disconnecting the significance, meaning, and sacredness from any specific archetype.”
(http://redsea1.websitetoolbox.com/post?id=2562581)

Africa vision
Photo By sabin-boykinov

Read more about the Greek and Roman influence on Africa’s etymology.

As I stumbled across quite a few forums and discussions about this very matter, it became clear that there is a very present and real debate on the go about the origin of our continent’s name, and what I found is that our motherland’s true name is: Alkebulan.

Shape of Africa (Alkebulan)
Photo By Dariusz Klimczak

According to the following resource: Kemetic History of Afrika; the definition of Alkebulan is as follows:
“The ancient name of Africa was Alkebulan.
Alkebu-lan “mother of mankind” or “garden of eden”.
Alkebulan is the oldest and the only word of indigenous origin. It was used by the Moors, Nubians, Numidians, Khart-Haddans (Carthagenians), and Ethiopians.
Africa, the current misnomer adopted by almost everyone today , was given to this continent by the ancient Greeks and Romans. ”

Alkebulan (Africa)
Photo By Marco Escobedo

Perhaps in line with this new found knowledge, we should boldly go forward as ‘Alkebulanites’; true and sincere, moving to the beat of our own ancient drums.

The Art of Black Love

By: Kiara Sade

When you think of black love, what is the first thing that comes to mind? Does your heart race rapidly? Or does it crumble like a pillar of salt? Black love is the strength passed down from several generations. It is the sacrifices our ancestors endured for us to survive in this present day.

Whether it’s a love between two physical beings or self-love, it is the substance that keeps us going. Black love is the right amount of honey in your tea, sweet! It is comparable to that first sip of coffee in the morning. Black love is the sacrifices your parents made for you, to see you flourish, and the miles our people walked to see change in equality. It’s that love guarded by grandma’s prayers and our ancestor’s spirituals. Nothing is more righteous than our kind of love, it cannot compare. Black love is higher than any other, we are stronger together than we are apart.

When you’re infatuated with your significant lover, it is the feeling of never being neglected. Black love is coexisting in each other’s space and always feeling safe and protected. The power that unites us together is a force to be reckoned with. It is more than just infatuation, but rather the power that combines two halves into a whole. Especially when you come from similar backgrounds and face the same struggle of being black in this society.

It is that feel good music from those like Marvin Gaye and The Temptations. That sunshine on a cloudy day kind of love. It’s that love that keeps you up at night thinking about that one, the one you’ll fight for and do whatever it is to keep. Black love between two lovers is a game of give and take, and working towards a greater good in your relationship.

This generation lacks so much confidence in love, we are so focused on what the next best thing is rather than the love that is staring in our faces. We have been swallowed and consumed up by the demon called “pride.” Surely love is complicated, there will always be disagreements, arguments and quarrels but strength and patience will always balance things out.

With black love, comes self- love. As a black girl, we are often “You’re not good enough.” Whether is directly or indirectly. They mock our aesthetics just to steal them and make them ‘cool.’ From the cornrows we rock, to our genetic features; We are natural born trendsetters. Self-love comes from loving the skin you’re in, the different shapes, sizes, hues and flavors we come in.

It is looking at yourself in the mirror and accepting every flaw you carry and not changing who you are because of what “they” say. It is knowing you’re beautiful both when you’re BEAT TO THE GAWDS and when you have on that green tea mask with a bonnet on. Purify yourself girl! Black love is confidence; we all have it in us. Know that you are not the same as the next woman, you are your own kind of beautiful.

There is so much heat in that four letter word, but we we’re bred to love; it is embedded in our DNA. The most important ingredient in our culture is the power of love. Many will experience the energy and the feeling it gives. We must not take it lightly, but rather as a gift passed down from many moons. I ask, what is black love to you?

Please leave us a comment, we need your feed back.  Thank you and 1-love…

Black Love: What Is It, Exactly?

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Stockbyte/Thinkstock

Blackness is complicated and always will be, Very Smart Brothas’ Panama Jackson says, so it’s no surprise that the definition of “black love” isn’t simple.

… If two Black people are dating or married and in love, does that, by default constitute Black love? Is seeing a woman pick up her son and give him a kiss on the cheek … is that Black love? Or two good friends doing the Black man handshake-hug combo that I’ve seen so many other ethnicities f*ck up with tremendous aplomb.

Seriously, why is that sh*t so difficult. I’m not saying that we, The Blacks, are just more dexterous and athletic than everybody else, but we definitely have coordination on lock. You know what, we’re more athletic too. It takes a real athlete to do some of these handshakes we do. In high school, me and two of my best friends had a 15-step handshake. It was as ridiculous as it sounds. I promise.

Is that Black love? I mean the dedication and loyalty we exacted in order to efficiently bust out that handshake? We were committed to one another because who the hell else would we be able to do that? That’s got to be it right?

In truth, I think the entire concept of Black love is just that … a concept. [It’s] those horrendously cliche ass pictures that you see being sold in mall kiosks with some naked, rippled Black man holding some naked Nubian black woman with their bodies intertwined. While I’d never ever put that type of picture up in my house — my tastes are a bit more discerning than that — I get why they exist. Black love is the ideal of unity and togetherness. It’s this ideal of strength shared between two people attempting to reach a common goal …Please leave us your comments, we want to know how you feel and what you think Black Love is or isn’t?

 

Beauty Of The Week

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