I just don’t care anymore!!! I’m planning to leave this country!!! This is ur notice!!!! Fuk America!!!!

My people please listen to this and learn the trickery of the Beast. It’s time we wake the fuck up…. I am like my Sister, ready to leave this MF but please take time to listen… Truth from a Queen

The Black Woman Is God by merge(f): 3:08pm On Mar 08, 2009
the black woman is god!
to merely respect the great black woman is a trivial thing; indeed she is to be worshiped as a living goddess! we are to wait on the black queen as a servant, to kiss her feet, to bow in her presence. we are to love and adore her more than life. for she is life! she is creation, and she is love,
history
most african cultures, including that of ancient kemet are matrilineal. this means that ones identity is through his or her mother. the mother, the black queen, is the creator, the life force, the sustainer and the producer of life and ones identity.
“you know that in our country there were even matriarchal societies where women were the most important element. on the bijagos islands they had queens. they were not queens because they were the daughters of kings. they had queens succeeding queens. the religious leaders were women too, ” —amilcar cabral, return to the source, 1973
in kemet, rulers were often pictured with their mothers and ruled equally with their queens.
“it is said to be the custom among the nubians, when a king dies and leaves a son, and also a nephew, the son of his sister, that the latter reigns after his uncle, instead of the son, ” –abu salih, the armenian
the black queen in ancient kemet shared civic duties with her male counterpart. from the african perspective the feminine energy is glorious and vital!
in both the bible (exodus) and the quran (sura), it is spoken that shortly after being led out of egypt, the israelites constructed and began worshiping a ‘golden calf’. upon further inspection, it is obvious that this ‘golden-calf’ is in fact the kemetan cow goddess hetheru (see below). after spending so many years in kemet and observing the complex practices, culture and spiritual system of the egyptians (a system thousands of years in the making, with roots from the nubian people of kush — the egyptians were children and a colony of the kushites), it would be thought that moses would understand that the kemetans were not ‘idol worshipers’. that the image of the cow goddess only symbolically represents the nourishing and life-giving energy; the same energy in the black woman, the same energy that is an aspect of the all-encompassing transcendental god (neberdjer). so the israelites were in fact emulating a kemetian practice; the practice of devotional veneration to both the black woman, and to god!
it has now been undisputably proven that the human race originated in africa. we now know that all humans can trace their roots to a family in africa. we know that the first mother is an african woman. the beautiful black queen is the original woman, the mother and creator of us all.
goddesses
aset:
she is the feminine energy of the divine (father-mother-son) trinity (asar-aset-heru). she embodies powerful aspects of the feminine energy: love, wisdom, healing and nurturing. after being dismembered by set who represents uncontrolled passions and worldly desires, the many pieces of asar’s body were scattered across the globe. aset now embarked a long quest of devotional love in which she successfully found and collected the pieces of asars body. with this energy of love and healing she healed his body. after this resurrection, aset becomes impregnated by the spirit of asar. she gives virgin-birth to the prototype hero heru: the conqueror of the lower (wordly) self. heru attains divine-consciousness (identification with the higher self) and defeats set (ignorance) by doing battle with maat(truth, justice, righteousness). aset was said to have been a darkskinned child and was called khnemet-ankhetí (the living lady of love). ttere are statues throughout europe, especially greece, depicting aset as the prototype madonna. in these statues, she can be seen holding and suckling the baby heru. the mary-Jesus relationship and personalities are based on this black madonna prototype.
nebethet:
the sister of asar and aset. she represents nature and death. she represents the illusion of the physical world. nebethet represents the lower nature, and the mortal life: that which lives and dies. her sister aset is the complimentary aspect of existence: enlightenment, the transcendental and immortal reality of the divine and the spirit; the true essence, that which is eternal and abiding. the path of the aspirant is to become heru (as mortals, to become aware of our eternal essence, to identify with the divine, the immortal sustaining spirit that lives in and supports all of nature and creation). to become one with heru is to eventually become one with with asar (pure consciousness, pure spirit). while asar’s union with aset (cosmic consciousness and wisdom) produced heru, his drunken union with nebethet (nature) produced anpu (inipu). so to become asar is to attain a transcendental consciousness that knows both the spirit (aset) and nature (nebethet).

tefnut:
the consort of the wind/air god shu, the goddess tefnut represents the life force within air, which is itself a lifeforce. she also represents water and liquid substances and the power of water.

nut:
the mother goddess. she is the mother of asar and aset (father and mother of the divine trinity asar-aset-heru). she is the daughter of shu and tefnut (wind god and goddess). nut represents the heavens and the sky. she represents these aspects of the physical universe that we live in. nut lifts up all righteous aspirants into heaven to take their place as a shining spirit (star) on her body.(ashby)

mut:
the goddess mut is nature itself. she represents nature’s ability to regenerate or recycle herself. just as vultures sustain their lives by eating the dead carcasses of animals, she creates life out of death. her symbol is the vulture. mut takes in death and brings forth new life for the spiritual aspirant.

hapi:
androgynous god of the nile with protruding breast and belly that represent fertility. the same fertility that as the nile river, nourished the lands with annual floods. the goddess hapi nourishes the spirit as the nile nourishes the lands.

net:
the androgynous god/goddess of creation, action and battle. the aspirant must become net and take action for righteousness(maat) and justice.

hetheru:
the great cow goddess of life, creation and nurturing. the inexhaustible source of energy and vitality that sustains the universe.

amentet:
the female aspect of the cosmic reality (asar). she represents all aspects of both asar and aset. amentet represents the source of creation.

sekhmet:
this powerful lioness-headed goddess destroys, evil, darkness and ignorance. in this capacity she aids the aspirant towards truth and the light.

maat:
the goddess maat wears a feathered headdress. she sustains the universe and creation! maat is peace, love, harmony, balance, order and justice. she is the force and balance that hangs stars in galaxies and pushes galaxies through universes, she causes the rain to fall and flowers to blossom. she is the purity and clarity within the heart, mind and consciousness of the aspirant that leads to identification with the higher self and conquering of the lower self. she is balance. she is righteousness. maat is the foundation of life and culture of the ancient kemetians, and of any spirant on the spiritual path. maat is the source of life (ankhu maat).
conclusion

the black woman is the mother of all men. she is the creator. she has historically been the central point of the african and african-diasporic family.
“,  i was born of a lioness, child of soasoane. it is fitting that i should emulate her. she is my mother, she strapped me on her back. i was nursed by lions that wore skirts.” –basotho epic
the black woman is a composite and divine expression of all of the energies and qualities represented by the goddesses. her vibration of love, nurturing, healing and life is essential. just as her energy has created us, only she can save us. western media images that distort this truth and her beauty shall not be tolerated!!! to merely respect the great black woman is a trivial thing; indeed she is to be worshiped as a living goddess! we are to wait on the black queen as a servant, to kiss her feet, to bow in her presence. we are to love and adore her more than life. for she is life! she is creation, and she is love,

Re: The Black Woman Is God by merge(f): 4:25pm On Mar 08, 2009
The Black woman is God
Re: The Black Woman Is God by Horus(m): 11:37am On Apr 02, 2009

The Black woman was there first. Scientists today have discovered that the Y chromosome in sperm has 2.8 percent less genetic material than the X chromosome in the same sperm specimen. Researchers were able to sift sperm to produce samples in which 85 percent of the cells had an X chromosome. In fact, the X chromosome is five times larger than the Y chromosome, which means that females existed for generations without males. To get the Y chromosome out of an X chromosome, you lose one of your points, thus the chromosome is defected, which is why a man has the same components on his body, that the woman does. For example, the breast and Tips, however men don’t breastfeed. Men are a genetic defect of women. A woman not only breastfeeds her children, but she nurtures the whole world with her wisdom.
The Y chromosome comes from female scientists, as Ninti, known as Mother Ninti or Nunet, who experimented with the side of an X chromosome maiming it by removing 2.8 percent of X chromosomes. This resulted in a maimed lower right stem (see ‘xy’ photo), giving the appearance of a Y, which produces less genetic materials, resulting in a Y chromosome, called chromosomal manipulation, a well known experiment today.


the X and Y chromosome

Re: The Black Woman Is God by mnwankwo(m): 2:47pm On Apr 03, 2009

Horus:

The Black woman was there first. Scientists today have discovered that the Y chromosome in sperm has 2.8 percent less genetic material than the X chromosome in the same sperm specimen. Researchers were able to sift sperm to produce samples in which 85 percent of the cells had an X chromosome. In fact, the X chromosome is five times larger than the Y chromosome, which means that females existed for generations without males. To get the Y chromosome out of an X chromosome, you lose one of your points, thus the chromosome is defected, which is why a man has the same components on his body, that the woman does. For example, the breast and Tips, however men don’t breastfeed. Men are a genetic defect of women. A woman not only breastfeeds her children, but she nurtures the whole world with her wisdom.
The Y chromosome comes from female scientists, as Ninti, known as Mother Ninti or Nunet, who experimented with the side of an X chromosome maiming it by removing 2.8 percent of X chromosomes. This resulted in a maimed lower right stem (see ‘xy’ photo), giving the appearance of a Y, which produces less genetic materials, resulting in a Y chromosome, called chromosomal manipulation, a well known experiment today.


the X and Y chromosome

You can say what you believe without bringing science into it except you have scientific evidence for your position. What you said above is unscientific and their is no scientific evidence to support it. The female X-chromosome is not the precursor of the male Y-chromosome, rather both evolved from ancestral autosomes. See below this nature paper on the sequence of human X-chromosome and its comparison to the human Y-chromosome.

http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v434/n7031/pdf/nature03440.pdf

Marriage Was Not Designed To Make You Happ

Think on these things:

Marriage was not designed to make you happy, satisfied, or whole. If you go into it for any of the aforementioned reasons, you’re in for a rude awakening.
Some of my friend

s asked me to expound, so I guess I’ll take a stab at it here.

First let me preface this post by saying that I in no way claim to be an expert on marriage. My husband and I have been married a little under four years and we’re still learning a lot of things about being married. If you want expert advice, talk to someone who’s been at this for decades (and let me listen in). I can only share what I’ve learned so far. Further, I assure you that, despite the tone of this post, I really love being married. However, I don’t want people to be delusional about what marriage is or is not. So let me share with you what marriage cannot do.

Marriage cannot make you happy.

I think it’s safe to say that many people who want to be married think that marriage will make them happy, but I maintain that’s just not true. We’ve all grown up with the fairy tales where the princess finds a prince, gets married, and lives “happily ever after.” Simply put, nothing can “make” you happy. Absolutely nothing. Happiness is a personal choice and is not contingent upon one’s circumstances. There are plenty of happy poor folks and miserable millionaires. If you aren’t happy before marriage, chances are you won’t be happy in it. And unfortunately, a lot of people get dejected when they enter a marriage and realize they’re not as happy as they thought they’d be. Learn to be happy independent of outside influences.

Marriage does not equal satisfaction.

Let me be clear: you will not be completely satisfied in your marriage 100% of the time. You’re talking about two people who were raised by different mothers, were taught different standards, and somehow decided it would be a good idea to join together and become a unit. But because they are still two very distinct people, clashes naturally arise when expectations don’t align with reality. He has different ideas about cleaning than you do. She has different ideas about money than you do. You both thought sex would be more plentiful than it currently is. Somebody is going to be disappointed occasionally.

There is not a single person on earth who can completely live up to your expectations because all of us fall short. Whomever you marry will likely disappoint you, and I’m sure you won’t do much better. And don’t think you can change the things you don’t like about him or her. That’s a dead-end road, and even if you did “fix” those things, chances are you’d only find more things later that need to be “fixed.” Go into a marriage expecting the other person to fall short (within reason) and decide preemptively to extend some grace when they do.

Marriage cannot make you whole.

Everyone wants to feel complete, whether it’s in their careers or their personal lives. They somehow don’t feel like they can sit back, relax, and enjoy life until they have something they’ve always wanted. Sadly, plenty of people put their happiness on hold for some hypothetical day in the future when they have everything they want, including a marriage and family. If partial contentment is your status quo and the way you live your life, I can guarantee you that once you do obtain the things you think you want, you’ll find a reason not to be happy with them. Something will always be out of place.

Oh and another thing… do NOT go into a marriage expecting your spouse to make you better, fix your hurts from your past, or give you everything you ever thought you’d need. Only God can do that. Please, if you have personal issues that you’re aware of, work on them before you get married or you will sabotage yourself. Your spouse is not your therapist or your fairy godparent.

So, why get married in the first place?

Well, only you can answer that. But I can tell you one indispensible prerequisite for a successful marriage: be prepared to work. Marriage is beautiful, blessed, and sacred, but it’s not for punks. They say it takes work, but I say it more than requires work — it is work personified. It is a full-time job requiring a lot of spiritual, mental, and emotional strength. When you hear the words “for better or for worse,” imagine what the “worse” could possibly look like and honestly ask yourself if you have the wherewithal to thrive in those situations. If you don’t have it, that’s fine. There are far worse fates in life than to live it as a single person. But if you feel you have the fortitude to fully submit to another person until one of you leaves this earth, by all means go for it.

There is honestly no nobler thing than to dedicate your life to someone other than yourself, which is essentially what marriage is. You have to have the heart of a servant to do this thing correctly. Can you still fix him a plate even after he’s thoroughly pissed you off? Would you still put gas in her car for work tomorrow even after she’s stepped all over your ego? After days of fighting and arguing, can you still muster the humility to pray for one another? These are the types of things successfully married people do. In this job, you don’t clock out just because you’re not “feeling it.” That’s a hard thing for people to understand in a culture of selfishness, but it is what it is. Strong marriages are comprised of strong people, so you must ask yourself before you get to the altar, “Am I strong enough?” So, are you strong enough? And aren’t you worth it? I mean if you’re good enough for a man to lay with should you not be good enough for his to MARRY? JUST ASKING—-`1LOVE

Madam C. J. Walker

Madam C. J. Walker

Walker in the early 1900s                                                                     Madame_CJ_Walker
Born Sarah Breedlove
December 23, 1867
Delta, Louisiana, U.S.
Died May 25, 1919 (aged 51)
Irvington-on-Hudson, New York, U.S.
Nationality American
Children A’Lelia Walker

Madam Walker and several friends in her automobile

C. J. Walker Manufacturing Company, Indianapolis, 1911
Sarah Breedlove (December 23, 1867 – May 25, 1919), known as Madam C. J. Walker, was an African American entrepreneur, philanthropist, and the first female self-made millionaire in America.[1][2] She made her fortune by developing and marketing a line of beauty and hair products for black women under the company she founded, Madame C.J. Walker Manufacturing Company.

Contents [hide]
1 Early life
2 Career
3 The Walker System
4 Legacy
5 References
6 Further reading
7 Video links
8 External links
Early life[edit]
Sarah Breedlove was born on December 23, 1867 in Delta, Louisiana.[3] She was one of six children; she had a sister, Louvenia, and four brothers: Alexander, James, Solomon, and Owen Jr. Her parents and elder siblings were enslaved people on Madison Parish plantation, owned by Robert W. Burney. She was the first child in her family born into freedom after the Emancipation Proclamation was signed. Her mother died, possibly from cholera, in 1872. Her father remarried and died shortly afterward. Sarah, orphaned at the age of seven, moved in with her older sister Louvenia and brother inlaw Willie Powell. At the age of 14, she married Moses McWilliams to escape Powell’s mistreatment, and three years later her daughter, Lelia McWilliams, was born.[4] When Sarah was 20, her husband died, and Lelia was just 2 years old. Shortly afterward she moved to St. Louis, where three of her brothers lived. They were all barbers at a local barbershop. She managed to get a job as a washer woman. She barely earned more than a dollar a day but was determined to make enough money so that her daughter would be able to receive a formal education.[5]

Career[edit]
Sarah experienced severe dandruff and other scalp ailments. She developed baldness due to these skin disorders and the application of harsh products like lye that were included in soaps used to cleanse the hair.[6][7] Because most Americans lacked indoor plumbing, central heating and electricity, they bathed and washed their hair infrequently. Initially she learned about hair care from her brothers, who owned a barber shop in St. Louis.[6]

A container of Madame C.J. Walker’s Wonderful Hair Grower is held in the permanent collection of The Children’s Museum of Indianapolis.
Madame C.J. Walker’s Wonderful Hair Grower in the permanent collection of The Children’s Museum of Indianapolis.[8]
Around the time of the 1904 World’s Fair, she became a commission agent selling products for Annie Turnbo Malone, an African American hair care entrepreneur. While working with Annie Malone, she adapted her knowledge of hair and hair products. She moved to Denver to work on her hair care products, and married Charles Joseph Walker, a newspaper advertising salesman. She emerged with the name Madam C. J. Walker, an independent hairdresser and retailer of cosmetic creams. After their marriage Charles Walker provided advice on advertising and promotion, while Madam C. J. Walker trained women to become “beauty culturists” and to learn the art of selling. In 1906, Madam Walker put her daughter A’Lelia (née McWilliams) in charge of the mail order operation while she and her husband traveled throughout the southern and eastern United States to expand the business.[5][6][7]

While her daughter Lelia (later known as A’Lelia Walker) ran the mail order business from Denver, Madam Walker and her husband traveled throughout the southern and eastern states. They settled in Pittsburgh in 1908 and opened Lelia College to train “hair culturists.” In 1910 Walker moved to Indianapolis where she established her headquarters and built a factory, hair salon, and beauty school to train her sales agents. She later added a laboratory to help with research.[7] Sarah, now known as Madam C. J. Walker, was becoming very successful. Her business market expanded beyond the United States to Cuba, Jamaica, Haiti, Panama, and Costa Rica.[5][6]

Inspired by the model of the National Association of Colored Women, she began to organize her sales agents into local and state clubs. In 1917 she convened her first annual conference of the Madam Walker Beauty Culturists in Philadelphia. During the convention she gave prizes not only to the women who had sold the most products and brought in the most new sales agents, but also to those who had contributed the most to charity in their communities. She stressed the importance of philanthropy and political engagement.[6] This had a huge impact on expanding her business. She also started her own mail order business to keep up with the booming business, placing her daughter A’Lelia Walker in charge of it.[7][9]

She began to teach and train other black women in women’s independence, budgeting, and grooming in order to help them build their own businesses. She also gave lectures on political, economic and social issues at conventions sponsored by powerful black institutions. In 1917 she began organizing the Walker Hair Culturists Union of America. Its first convention in the summer of 1917 was one of the first national meetings of American women brought together to discuss business and commerce. She became involved in political matters, joining the executive committee of New York chapter of the NAACP, which organized the Silent Protest Parade. It was a public demonstration of more than 8,000 African Americans to protest a riot that killed 39 African Americans.[5]
The grave of Madam C. J. Walker
In 1917, she commissioned Vertner Tandy, the first licensed black architect in New York State and a founding member of Alpha Phi Alpha fraternity, to design a house for her in Irvington-on-Hudson, New York, Villa Lewaro.[10] The house cost $250,000 to build.[10] She moved into Villa Lewaro in May 1918 and hosted an opening event to honor Emmett Scott, then the Assistant Secretary for Negro Affairs of the United States War Department.[6]

Just before her death she pledged $5,000, the equivalent of about $65,000 in 2012, to the NAACP’s anti-lynching fund. Madam C. J. Walker died at Villa Lewaro on Sunday, May 25, 1919,[4][10] from complications of hypertension. She was 51. In her will she directed two-thirds of future net profits of her estate to charity; she bequeathed nearly $100,000 to orphanages, institutions, and individuals.[1][5] At her death she was considered to be the wealthiest African American woman in America. According to Walker’s New York Times obituary, “she said herself two years ago [in 1917] that she was not yet a millionaire, but hoped to be some time.”[10] Her daughter, A’Lelia Walker, became the president of the Madame C.J. Walker Manufacturing Company.[6]

The Walker System[edit]
Madam Walker’s System included a shampoo, a pomade stated to help hair grow, strenuous brushing and applying iron combs to hair. This method claimed to transform lusterless and brittle hair into soft luxurious hair. The manufacturing company employed women who, dressed in a characteristic uniform of white shirts and black skirts, and carrying black satchels, made house calls widely around the United States and in the Caribbean. The pomade and other products were packaged in tin containers carrying a picture of Madame Walker, which, accompanied by heavy advertising, made Madame Walker well known in the US and more widely in the 1920s. Similar products came to be produced in Europe and by other companies in the United States, including those set up by Mrs. Annie M. Turnbo Malone (“Poro System”) and Madame Sarah Spencer Washington (“Apex System”.) [11]

Legacy[edit]
Madam Walker’s legacy remains through National Historic Landmarks, one of which is Villa Lewaro located in Irvington, New York. Villa Lewaro was auctioned off and eventually sold to a fraternal organization called the Companions of the Forest in America in 1932. After being privately owned in 1979 Villa Lewaro was listed on the National Register of Historic Places.[12] Other properties Walker owned was the Walker Manufacturing Company Building located in Indianapolis. The building previously contained a restaurant, barbershop, drugstore, and the Walker factory. The building was renamed The Madame Walker Theater Center and now is on the National Register of Historic Places.[13]

Various scholarships and awards have been named after Madam Walker one of which is the Madam C.J Walker Business and Community Recognition Awards held by the National Coalition of 100 Black Women, Oakland Bay Area chapter. The annual awards luncheon honors Walker and follows in her footsteps honoring outstanding women in the community with scholarships.[14] The Madame Walker Theatre Center also honors leaders in entrepreneurship to pay tribute to Madam Walker. The awards that are presented to individuals are The Madame C.J Walker heritage award as well as young entrepreneur and legacy awards which embody what Madam Walker represented.[15]