Human Rights Organizations, NGOs and community organizers submit U.S. Political Prisoner Human Rights Violations and Recommendations to the Universal Periodic Review (UPR)

 

For Immediate Release Contact: Attorney. Standish E. Willis April 20, 2010 312-750-1950 Human Rights Organizations, NGOs and community organizers submit U.S. Political Prisoner Human Rights Violations and Recommendations to the Universal Periodic Review (UPR) CHICAGO, IL- Various NGOs, grassroots organizations, church groups, attorney organizations, elected officials, college professors, law professionals, students and concerned citizens prepared and submitted a cluster report to the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR) as a part of the Universal Periodic Review of the United States As a member of the United Nations, and a party to the Universal Declaration of Human Rights Treaty, the United States will be reviewed by the UN Human Rights Council for the first time in November 2010 during the Universal Periodic Review (UPR).

This review will assess the United States’ adherence to its human rights obligations, human rights treaties ratified by the country, its voluntary commitments, and applicable international law.

This peer-review process will ascertain the progress each of the 192 UN member states have made in the area of human rights, as well as identify areas for improvement. As a part of the UPR process, a stakeholder cluster report concerning human rights abuses inflicted on Political Prisoners and Prisoners of War, along with recommendations for correcting these abuses has been submitted to the Office of High Commissioner for Human Rights. In 1976, a Congressional Subcommittee, popularly known as the "Church Committee", was formed to investigate and study the FBI’s covert action programs. In its report,

The Church Committee concluded that the FBI had "conducted a sophisticated vigilante operation aimed squarely at preventing the exercise of First Amendment Rights of speech and association, on the theory that preventing the growth of dangerous groups and propagation of dangerous ideas would protect the national security and deter violence."

In fact, before COINTELPRO was laid to rest, it was responsible for maiming, murdering, false prosecutions and frame-ups, destruction, and mayhem throughout the country. In 1969, COINTELPRO tactics were responsible for the pre-dawn assassination of Black Panther leaders Fred Hampton and Mark Clark. Among COINTELPRO’S other targets were Dr. Martin Luther King, Kwame Ture (Stokely Carmichael), Huey Newton, and Leonard Peltier.

The report specifically cites numerous examples of the United States’ violation of its Universal Declaration of Human Rights and the International Convention on the Elimination of all form or Racial Discrimination (CERD) treaties as follows: U.S. political prisoners have been incarcerated as a result of the United States Government COINTELPRO, which targeted black national groups during the Civil Rights Movement U.S. political prisoners have languished in U.S. prisons over four decades due to the excessively punitive nature of lengthy sentences; they are routinely denied parole despite exemplary prison records; they are subject to prolonged isolation due to their status as political prisoners and not due to disciplinary infractions, which is a violation of the Convention Against Torture.

The human rights abuses of political prisoners has been exacerbated post- September 11th, resulting in prisoners held in solitary confinement 23 hours a day and denial of counsel without any charges or allegations against them with respect to national security

The complacence of the U.S. government in failing to develop strategies to investigate and rectify the conditions under which the prisoners were incarcerated, and the subsequent conditions of their confinement is itself a human rights violation. The report recommends the United States follows the example of UN member states Germany, France, and Spain by immediately and unconditionally releasing all U.S. Political Prisoners/Prisoners of War.

The report also recommends the United States to initiate criminal investigations into the conspiracy to commit murder and the murder of political activists targeted by COINTELPRO. n compliance with its human rights obligations the United States must adopt measures to ensure the right of political prisoners/prisoners of war to seek just and adequate reparation to redress acts of racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance, and to design effective measures to prevent repetition of such acts. —

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Elections In Sudan: A Travelogue from a DC Observer

 


ELECTIONS IN SUDAN: A TRAVELOGUE FROM A DC OBSERVER

www.muslimlinkpaper.com

by Hodari Abdul-Ali, Muslim Link Contributing Writer

Alhamdulilah, I was blessed to be invited to be an observer of the historic elections that took place in Sudan April 11-15, 2010.  What follows are highlights from a travelogue I kept while on this journey to Africa’s largest country at a special time in its history.
Sunday, 11 April 2010 7am – Khartoum, Sudan
Alhamdulilah, I am in the Grand Holiday Villa Hotel on Nile Avenue, already mid-way through my “Journey to Sudan”. I am safe, and I feel happy to be back in what has been my favorite African country.
This is my 6th time here. Previously I was here in 1994 as part of a Muslim-Christian delegation lead by Dr. Leamon Bates and Imam Ba’th. Imam W. D. Mohammed was there as well.  We visited Khartoum and Wau, a town in southern Sudan. In 1995 I visited in Khartoum.
In 2002  the fact-finding mission I led went to Egypt and Sudan. The delegation included many Islamic and community leaders, including several from MANA, the Muslim Alliance in North America.
In 2005 I led a 2nd fact-finding delegation that visited Khartoum and Darfur. In August 2008, I visited in Khartoum. And here I am again!
One amazing thing about having returned so many times is seeing the progress over the years. There are more businesses, paved roads, newer cars and buses, etc, just since the 1 ½ years I was last here.
This has been an interesting trip so far, just travel wise. My body is still adjusting from the jet lag and the time zone changes. Alhamdulilah, I am in a comfortable room and haven’t had any problems.
I left DC from Dulles Airport at 6pm. My friend and colleague Bill Reed took me. I was already tired from having been up very early (3am) to prepare and then host my radio show on WPFW.
In my capacity as Executive Director of Give Peace A Chance Coalition (GPAC), I decided that it was worth the sacrifice and effort to be an observer here for such a historic event, the elections in Sudan.  These are the first nation-wide elections in over 24 years, and today is the 1st day of 3 days of polling. There is much anticipation as this is a pivotal step in the Comprehensive Peace Agreement (CPA) that was signed in 2005 ending a 2 decade long war between the north and south.
The western media has been very negative in spite of the fact that the campaigning was free of violence and that 16 million people have been registered to vote, and over 14,000 people are candidates! Folks who are salivating at the likelihood of the south separating in the referendum scheduled for next January are upset that President Bashir is far more popular than they want to acknowledge, and that the international monitors have basically said “so far, so good”.
The Sudan People’s Liberation Movement (SPLM) is a confused lot, confounding its own supporters and critics alike. One top official, SPLM Secretary General Pagun Amum, stated that the party was boycotting the entire election process in northern Sudan. The next  day, SPLM Chairman Silva Kiir Mayardit said they were not boycotting, only withdrawing their presidential candidate, Yasir Arman.
Conflicting reasons were given for this, but the bottom line is that they and some of the other opposition parties knew they were going to lose, so they cried foul. The ruling National Congress Party (NCP) on the other hand, campaigned vigorously throughout the country. We shall see the results soon.
Alhamdulilah, each night I’ve had visits from friends here. I made it to jumaa prayer, and yesterday attended the press conference of the National Elections Commission held at Friendship Hall.  The hotel I’m in also serves as the headquarters for the African Union election monitors, so I’ve had a chance to speak to some of them.
===
Monday, 12 April 2010 7:30am
Alhamdulilah, I’m in flight on my way to Juba for the 1st time! Although friends cautioned me about going, I want to see the capital of southern Sudan with my own eyes. On my first trip to Sudan in 1994, I visited Wau, the second largest town in the south. It was like going back in time 100 years. Next to Haiti, it was the poorest place I’d ever seen. I’m anxious to see what progress has been made. It is over 100 degrees in Khartoum, and I’m hoping Juba won’t be as hot.
===
Monday, 12 April 2010 3:00pm
I  am back at the Juba “International Airport” after a brief visit here. Alhamdulilah I am heading back to Khartoum. A few hours here was enough. It was very hot and dusty and uncomfortable. There is very little here! Masha Allah.
I met several people here who were kind to me, including the Program Director for southern Sudan radio; the Deputy Chairman of the south Sudan High Election Committee; and the Imam of the large Kuwait Masjid.
I visited a polling site, toured a market, made salat at the masjid and had a very nice talk with the Imam about Islam in America and Juba. There is some building going on around town that I saw, but I don’t see much evidence of the billions of dollars of oil revenue at the disposal of the government of southern Sudan (GOSS).
The Imam, Abu Al-Qasim Muhammad, told me there are more Muslims than Christians in Juba, though the majority of people practice neither. He said that Muslims don’t have problems here.
Juba feels totally different from Khartoum. Khartoum is like New York City compared Juba being a town in rural West Virginia. I feel like I’m in East Africa (like Kenya or Uganda) and not in Sudan. The land is greener, but many folks are literally living in huts.
I can understand the frustration of the people of southern Sudan, for there is very little here. If Juba is the best, I can only imagine what the rest of the south looks like. The big question in my mind is what kind of leadership has the SPLM provided? What have they done with all of the money?
===
Tuesday, 13 April 2010 8pm
Alhamdulilah, I’ve left Khartoum and  am on the plane in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia for a brief layover before traveling to Amsterdam. The flight there is 8 hrs, followed by an 8 hour layover, followed by an 8 hour flight to Washington. I feel good however, and am glad I’ve had a good trip thus far and learned a lot.
Today is day 3 of the historic elections in Sudan, the 1st multi-party exercise in 24 years. Because of logistical challenges, the voting has been extended two more days. Results are to be announced April 18th. Fortunately the process has been peaceful despite boycotts and complaints from opposition parties. President Al-Bashir seems headed for a landslide victory, which is why disorganized and disgruntled opposition parties and Machiavellian interests such as Save Darfur Coalition complained about rigging long before the election even began!
They have even complained about U.S. envoy Scott Gration, former President Jimmy Carter  and other monitors for acknowledging that over all, the elections have been free and fair. Who could not expect logistical problems in a huge country with poor infrastructure outside of Khartoum, massive illiteracy, especially in southern Sudan, and one of the most complicated ballots imaginable?
This was the 1st time Silva Kiir Mayardit, SPLM Chairman and President of the GOSS had voted, and even he made a mistake! Voters in the 15 northern states have 8 ballots to contend with, and those in the 10 southern states have 12 ballots. Voters are electing the President, governors, members of parliament and state legislators. There would be complaints and difficulties in the U.S.!
The SPLM have proven to be a confusing and inefficient lot. Their secretary general states that the party would be boycotting all elections in the north, and then a day later, the chairman (President Kiir) states that there was only the boycott (withdrawal of their candidate for the presidency, Yasir Arman) of the top office. Conflicting reasons were given for these decisions, but clearly northern opposition parties were disappointed because they wanted a total boycott, and SPLM supporters felt betrayed because they wanted to vote for someone other than President Bashir.
Mind you, there are still 11 other candidates, and even Arman is still on the ballot! In the south, the SPLM have been heavy-handed against independent candidates, and are aghast that President Bashir is poised to win a lot of votes there. Kiir is expected to win easily for the presidency of the GOSS, and after the elections, the real drama is due to play out.
The referendum for southern succession, mandated by the CPA signed in 2005, as were these elections, will usher in a whole new set of negotiations between Khartoum and Juba. The vote is scheduled for January 2011, with separation a likelihood. There are many problems however. As much as the southerners want independence, they are clearly not ready.
I truly feel bad for the people of southern Sudan. The west wants to blame Khartoum for not making “unity attractive”, but the real reality is that the SPLM-lead GOSS has very little to show for the hundreds of billions of dollars it has gotten from oil revenues received during the 1st five years of the CPA, as well as international aid funds received.
President Bashir stated that he still intends to champion unity. Personally, I believe unity is the best solution for Sudan, and indeed Africa as a whole.  More likely, however, is that the two sides will have to negotiate a “civil divorce”, as the oil in the south will still have to be shipped and refined in the north for the foreseeable future. There is big corruption in the south, and much tribal violence.
A third option is also being discussed, that of a confederation of some type.  I’m reminded of the saying “be careful what you wish for, you might get it”. The US has been pushing for separation for so long now, and now that it is within reach, realizes that there may be more problems than it is worth.
===
Wednesday 12:30pm  14 April 2010  – In the air between Amsterdam and Washington, DC
Alhamdulilah, I’m on the final leg of my journey to Africa and back. The traveling has been a bit uncomfortable, but, alhamdulilah, I’ve not gotten ill. Just deprived of sleep!
After an overnight flight from Khartoum (with a stop in Addis Ababa) to Amsterdam, I ventured out into the city for the first time. I exchanged my dollars for euros, caught the train to Amsterdam Centraal , and walked around a bit. The weather there was chilly, especially after coming from a 100 degree F climate.
Amsterdam reminded me of London in a way, with its large public squares, broad and old buildings, quaint shops and restaurants. Being in Africa and Europe even this short time is a reminder that the world doesn’t all speak English. In fact, it seems to do quite well without it! I knew Khartoum was Arabic, and after a bit I was able to recall certain phrases. I expected more English in Juba, but they were quite content speaking Arabic and other languages there as well. Netherlands  speaks Dutch, and at all the airports I traverse through, I heard a wide variety of languages. That aspect alone makes travel interesting.
I only spent a couple of hours in Amsterdam, and had a lunch of falafel and  French fries at a Muslim owned café. Everything is expensive here, using $US.
I am truly looking forward to going home and being with my wife Ayana. It was a blessing to get away in spite of the challenges, and a blessing to get back into the routine. InshaAllah I will become more effective in my work, and stay focused on my variety of efforts, be they Dar Es Salaam Books, Give Peace A Chance Coalition, WPFW, etc.
I am grateful to Allah for all of my blessings.  Overall, I am grateful to have been able to have been in Sudan during its landmark elections. I pray that Allah will bless the people there to solve their problems with fairness. InshaAllah, these elections will provide a new impetus, even though there were some shortcomings.
——————–
Hodari Abdul-Ali lives in DC where he is a well known Muslim activist.


The New Busy think 9 to 5 is a cute idea. Combine multiple calendars with Hotmail. Get busy.

LETTER TO GRASSROOTS CONCERNING MUMIA ABU-JAMAL FOR MARCH ON MONDAY APRIL 26

 

LETTER TO THE GRASSROOTS CONCERNING MUMIA ABU-JAMAL

Note: March & Rally on Monday, April 26, at 10:30 a.m.

New York Avenue Presbyterian Church

1313 New York Avenue, N.W.

Washington, D.C.

Last week, Rev. Benjamin Hooks, at age 85, and Dorothy Height, at age 98, died after decades of struggle in the black liberation movement.  To be sure, they labored in that part of the black liberation movement which focused on our civil rights.  And their labor bore fruit.

For Benjamin Hooks, when the NAACP appeared to be hopelessly dormant and irrelevant, Rev. Hooks stepped in as the executive director and for a time reinvigorated the NAACP’s efforts at aggressively protecting the interests of black people in education, in voting rights, in civil rights legislation, in affirmative action and small business development, and against racially bigoted prosecutions.

In the case of Dorothy Height who died five days after Hooks, Ms. Height started as a protégé of Dr. Mary McLeod Bethune in the National Council of Negro Women.  For nearly seven decades, she pressed forward the concerns of black people, especially those of black women.  From 1955 through 1963, she asserted herself in the newly militant civil rights movement, mainly as a lobbyist and as a national organizer, but always as part of the foundation of our civil rights movement.

Nevertheless, Dorothy Height’s and Benjamin Hooks’ work failed to end the racially bigoted prosecution and imprisonment of black people by the American police state.  While American prisons house more than 2.6 million people, more than fifty percent are black men.  While U.S. death rows imprison and plan to execute nearly 3,300 people, about 42 percent of that number are black men.  Worst still, the black female prison population increases at a faster rate than any other class, faster even than that of young black men.  Since black prisoners in the U.S. are usually from fifteen to thirty-nine years old, that is, of child bearing age, the racially disproportionate imprisonment and execution of our people amounts to legalized genocide.

All of this brings us from Benjamin Hooks and Dorothy Height to the noted black journalist, Mumia Abu-Jamal.  A former Black Panther, a renowned journalist for justice and peace, and an outspoken gadfly against American bigotry, Mumia faces certain execution on Pennsylvania‘s death row, but for a crime he never committed.  During Mumia Abu-Jamal’s trial in Philadelphia in 1982, the judge confided among whites that he, a white judge, would "help to fry the nigger"!  A nurse who testified against Mumia confessed that she lied on the witness stand when she claimed that Mumia confessed to killing a white police officer.  As for that white cop, Mumia Abu-Jamal saw this man viciously beating Mumia’s brother, Billy Cook.  Mumia understandably ran towards the beating to rescue his brother.  When that happened, the white police officer shot Mumia Abu-Jamal, but only after another black man gunned down the cop for his violence against Billy Cook.  While Mumia Abu-Jamal lay on the ground with his brother at his side, the killer who saved Billy Cook from a vicious police beating escaped on foot.

After Mumia survived this gunshot wound, he faced a racially bigoted prosecution.  Months later, a largely white jury and the white judge who promised "to fry the nigger" convicted Mumia Abu-Jamal and sentenced him to death.  Unknown to Mumia and his lawyer, the prosecution worked in illegal and racist fashion to exclude black people from the jury who decided Mumia’s fate.  Mumia Abu-Jamal has been in prison for nearly thirty years, since December 9, 1981.  In an effort to advance the work of Dorothy Height and Benjamin Hooks, we must rally for the liberation of this wrongly convicted black man.

This will happen on Monday, April 26, 2010, at 10:30 a.m., in Washington, D.C., where we will march against the Obama Justice Department and demand that the "change we want" start with a federal probe of the racist bigotry that put Mumia Abu-Jamal in prison and on Pennsylvania’s death row.  The rally will start at the New York Avenue Presbyterian Church, located at 1313 New York Avenue, N.W., in Washington, D.C.  We start at the church with a massive press conference.  Then, we march on the Obama Justice Department to demand a federal probe that should have taken place nearly thirty years ago.

Be with us on Monday, April 26, at 10:30 a.m., at the New York Avenue Presbyterian Church, at 1313 New York Avenue, N.W., in Washington, D.C.  Mumia Abu-Jamal’s life and liberty may well depend upon your effort.

Thomas Ruffin

Nat Turner Rebellion

Legal Counsel of the Black August Planning Organization

Youth Conference

 

Anybody wanna go?  Let me know….
Naji

 

Greetings,

The Center for African American Youth and Public Policy and The Philadelphia Community Institute of Africana Studies would like to cordially invite you to the “Black Youth in the Age of Obama” conference.
The purpose of this conference is to present a comprehensive direction for a network by African-American youth. Such a network is envisioned to be based on direct action, helping to facilitate a movement for social change in the 21st century.

Please lend your support by coming out Friday, April 30, Saturday, May 1, and Sunday, May 2, 2010 to be apart of a groundbreaking movement that will lead to social change for our African American Youth.
Attached you will find a Conference schedule, Registration form and Flyer for the conference including all pertinent information.


~ I most sincerely doubt if any other race of women could
have brought its fineness up through so devilish a fire.-
W.E.B. Du Bois

Katrina S. W. Williams, BA
Coordinator
The Center for African American Research and Public Policy CAARPP
Temple University
www.temple.edu/caarpp
Tell: (215) 204-0097
Fax: (215) 204-5953

Tanay Lynn Harris
Center for African American Research and Public Policy
Department of African American Studies
Department of Sociology
College of Liberal Arts
Temple University

www.temple.edu/caarpp
215.204.0096


Tanay Lynn Harris
Center for African American Research and Public Policy
Department of African American Studies
Department of Sociology
College of Liberal Arts
Temple University
215.204.0096


"I would like to leave behind me the conviction that if we maintain a certain amount of caution and organization we deserve victory… You cannot carry out fundamental change without a certain amount of madness. In this case, it comes from nonconformity, the courage to turn your back on the old formulas, the courage to invent the future. It took the madmen of yesterday for us to be able to act with extreme clarity today. I want to be one of those madmen. We must dare to invent the future."
-Thomas Sankara, 1985

Come join me on BLACK UNITY & AFRICAN PEOPLE OF LOVE UNIFICATION

 

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Come join me on BLACK IS BACK COALITION on AFRICAN PEOPLE OF LOVE UNIFICATION

 

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